You’ve Got to Eat More to Lose More

Posted by on Nov 3, 2013 in Blog, Nutrition | 0 comments

You’ve Got to Eat More to Lose More

 

I’ve been stuck in a plateau for a while now and I figured the best thing to do was go back to the basics. I’ve been reading back through my “fitness bible”, Burn the Fat Feed the Muscle, by Tom Venuto. It seems like I was experiencing the bests results back when I was following the principles in this book. In addition to reading through my fitness bible I have also been logging my nutrition over the past few weeks. I use the free app called Lose It. Through logging my nutrition I can really see what my daily calorie intake is, what percentage of my calories are coming from carbs, fat and protein, my sodium intake, water intake, and how many calories I’m burning daily through exercise.

To my surprise, I’ve realized that my calories are in too much of a deficit. I’ve been creating this deficit for too long. My plateau is the direct result of not eating enough calories and my body going into “starvation mode”.

ramp_up_metabolismIt’s so important that you fuel your body, not only with the right foods but the appropriate amount of calories. This is something that I have struggled with for years. It’s hard to not listen to that little voice inside your head that say’s “Well, I must be the exception to that rule.” In our heads we think that if we want to lose weight we need to eat less. THIS IS SO INCREDIBLY WRONG. Yes, you must create a calorie deficit, whether that be from exercise or nutrition, but before we start hacking away at our calorie count, we need to look at how many calories the body SHOULD be taking in JUST TO SURVIVE.

The total number of calories you need to consume on a daily basis is better known as your Total Daily Energy Expenditure (TDEE).  It is also know as your “maintenance level” calories. The average maintenance level calories, based on exercise physiologists William McArdle and Frank Katch, for women in the United States are 2000-21000 and men are 2700-2900.

 

HOW DO YOU DETERMINE THE AMOUNT OF CALORIES YOU NEED TO SURVIVE?

The first thing you need to know is your basal metabolic rate (BMR). There are two formulas that can be used to determine your BMR: The Harris-Benedict Formula, which determines your BMR based on your total body weight, and the Katch-McArdle Formula, which determines your BMR based on your lean body weight.

The Harris-Benedict Formula

Men: BMR = 66 + (13.7 X wt in kg) + (5 X ht in cm) – (6.8 X age in years)
Women: BMR = 655 + (9.6 X wt in kg) + (1.8 X ht in cm) – (4.7 X age in years)

1 inch = 2.54 centimeters
1 kilogram = 2.2 lbs

Now that you know your BMR you can calculate your TDEE by multiplying your BMR by the following activity factor.

Activity factor
Sedentary = BMR X 1.2 (little or no exercise, desk job)
Lightly active = BMR X 1.375 (light exercise/sports 1-3 days/wk)
Mod. active = BMR X 1.55 (moderate exercise/sports 3-5 days/wk)
Very active = BMR X 1.725 (hard exercise/sports 6-7 days/wk)
Extr. Active = BMR X 1.9 (hard daily exercise/sports & physical job or
2 X day training, marathon, football camp,
contest, etc.)

The Katch-McArdle Formula

BMR (men and women) = 370 + (21.6 X lean mass in kg)

Your TDEE

To determine TDEE from BMR, you simply multiply BMR by the activity factor.

Activity factor
Sedentary = BMR X 1.2 (little or no exercise, desk job)
Lightly active = BMR X 1.375 (light exercise/sports 1-3 days/wk)
Mod. active = BMR X 1.55 (moderate exercise/sports 3-5 days/wk)
Very active = BMR X 1.725 (hard exercise/sports 6-7 days/wk)
Extr. Active = BMR X 1.9 (hard daily exercise/sports & physical job or
2 X day training, marathon, football camp,
contest, etc.)

WHAT TO DO NEXT

Now that you know what you need to consume daily just to maintain you weight, you can determine what amount you would need to consume to create a deficit. the safest place to start is by reducing your calories by 15-20% below your maintenance level.

I’ve gone through all of these formulas to determine my BMR and TDEE. So what I will be focusing on over the next few weeks is gradually increasing my calories. For my height, weight and lean body mass. I should be consuming between 1900-2300 calories daily. I’m embarrassed to admit that my calories were falling closer within the 1100-1500 range. So I will be slowly ramping my calories up, which will in turn begin speeding my metabolism back up.

Stay tuned in for future updates as well as the meal plans I will be following.

Want to grab your copy of what I like to call my “fitness bible”? You can pre-order the new release of it off Amazon HERE.

bffm

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